Taxi Koh Samet

Feel like an escape from the hustle and bustle of Bangkok or the nightlife of Pattaya, Koh Samet is just a few hours drive from either City, Pattaya being a little closer.  Koh Samet is a quiet Island paradise ideal for rest and relaxation.

Koh Samet has been declared a National Park in Thailand and therefore has an entry fee. Thai citizens pay 40 baht, foreigners (farangs) pay 400 baht. If your ferry arrives at the main pier and you take a songthaew (truck like taxi) to the beaches, there will be a stop at the main ticket checkpoint. If your ferry arrives at one of the   beaches, an officer will collect the fee as you step out onto the white sand……

Koh samet The ferry for Koh Samet is taken from Ban Phe…….

Koh Samet Ferry

Ferry from Ban Phe to Koh Samet

Ferries for the main pier ‘Na Dan Pier’ leave every hour
Ferry leaves at 9:00,   12:00, 13:30 and 17:00 every day to Vong Duern Beach at 40 Baht per ticket

Ferry   leaves at 11:30 and 14:00 to Ao Wai at the cost of 80 Baht per ticket

Ferry   leaves at 10:00 Ao Kiu at 100 Baht per ticket

Ferry leaves at 08:00, 11:00,   13:00 and 16:00 to Ao Prao at 80 Baht per ticket
Ferry from Koh Samet to Ban Phe

Ferries from the main pier ‘Na Dan Pier’ leave for Koh Samet every hour.

Ferry leaves Vong Duern Beach at 08:30, 12:00, and 15:30

Ferry   leaves Ao Wai at 14:00

Ferry leaves Ao Kiu at 08:00 and 12:00

Ferry leaves Ao   Prao at at 10:00, 12:30, 15:00 and 17:00.

Taxi Koh Samet

Some interesting facts about Thailand

Thais make up the majority of the population with 75 percent of all inhabitants. Thai Chinese make up 14 percent with the remaining 11 percent made up of various other groups.

The language of the central Thai population is the educational and administrative language. Several other small Thai groups include the Shan, Lue, and Phu Thai.

Malay and Yawi-speaking Muslim’s language of the south comprise another significant minority group (2.3%). Other groups include the Khmer; the Mon, who are substantially assimilated with the Thai; and the Vietnamese. Smaller mountain-dwelling tribes, such as the Hmong and Mien, as well as the Karen, number about 788,024. Some 300,000 Hmong, who ironically have lived this area f more generations than the Thais themselves, are to receive citizenship by 2010.

Thailand is also home to more than 200,000 foreigners from, for example, Europe (specifically United Kingdom) and North America. Increasing numbers of migrants from Burma, Laos, and Cambodia as well as nations such as Nepal, India, along with those from the West and Japan had pushed the total number of non-nationals residing in Thailand to around 3.5 million by the end of 2009, up from an estimated 2 million in 2008, and about 1.3 million in the year 2000. A rising awareness of minorities is slowly changing attitudes in a country where non-nationals, some having resided in what is now Thailand longer than the Thais themselves, are barred from numerous privileges ranging from healthcare, ownership of property, or schooling in their own language.

Population distribution

The population is mostly rural, concentrated in the rice-growing areas of the central, northeastern, and northern regions. However, as Thailand continues to industrialize, its urban population – 45.7% (in 2010, according to NESDB) of the total population, principally in the Bangkok area – is growing.

Thailand’s highly successful government-sponsored family planning program has resulted in a dramatic decline in population growth from 3.1% in 1960 to around 0.4% today. The Worldbank forecasts a contraction of the population in ten years time. In 1970, an average of 5.7 people lived in a Thai household. At the time of the 2010 census, the figure was down to 3.2. Even though Thailand has one of the best social insurance systems in Asia, the increasing group of elderly people is a challenge for the country.

The 1997 constitution mandated 12 years of free education, however, this is not provided universally. Education accounts for 19% of total government expenditures.

Religion

Theravada Buddhism is the official religion of Thailand and is officially the religion of about 97% of its people. Muslims are some 10% and 5% other religions including Christianity, Hinduism, especially among immigrants. In addition to Malay and Yawi speaking Thais and other southerners who are Muslim, the Cham of Cambodia in recent years begun a large scale influx into Thailand. The government permits religious diversity, and other major religions are represented, though there is much social tension, especially in the South.

Customs

Thai greeting, the smile is an important symbol of refinement in Thai culture.

The traditional customs and the folklore of Thai people were gathered and described by Phya Anuman Rajadhon in the 20th century, at a time when modernity changed the face of Thailand and a great number of traditions disappeared or became adapted to modern life. Still, the strife towards refinement, rooted in ancient Siamese culture, consisting in promoting what is refined and avoiding coarseness is the main emphasis in the daily life of all Thai people and topmost in their scale of values.

One of the most distinctive Thai customs is the wai. Showing greeting, farewell, or acknowledgement, it comes in several forms reflecting the relative status of those involved. Generally the salutation involves a prayer-like gesture with the hands, similar to the Añjali Mudrā of the Indian subcontinent, and it also may include a slight bow of the head. This salutation is often accompanied by a serene smile symbolizing a welcoming disposition and a pleasant attitude. Thailand is often referred to as the “Land of Smiles” in tourist brochures.

Public display of affection in public is not overly common in traditional Thai society, especially between lovers. However, views are changing to accept this and it is becoming more common, especially among the younger generation.

A notable social norm holds that touching someone on the head may be considered rude. It is also considered rude to place one’s feet at a level above someone else’s head, especially if that person is of higher social standing. This is because the Thai people consider the foot to be the dirtiest and lowliest part of the body, and the head the most respected and highest part of the body. This also influences how Thais sit when on the ground—their feet always pointing away from others, tucked to the side or behind them. Pointing at or touching something with the feet is also considered rude.

Since serene detachment is valued, conflict and sudden displays of anger are eschewed in Thai culture and, as is many Asian cultures, the notion of face is extremely important. For these reasons, visitors should take care not to create conflict, to display anger or to cause a Thai person to lose face. Disagreements or disputes should be handled with a smile and no attempt should be made to assign blame to another. In everyday life in Thailand, there is a strong emphasis on the concept of sanuk’; the idea that life should be fun. Because of this, Thai can be quite playful at work and during day-to-day activities. Displaying positive emotions in social interactions is also important in Thai culture. Often, the Thai will deal with disagreements, minor mistakes or misfortunes by using the phrase “mai pen rai”, translated as “it doesn’t matter”. The ubiquitous use of this phrase in Thailand reflects a disposition towards minimizing conflict, disagreements or complaints. A smile and the sentence “mai pen rai” indicate that the incident is not important and therefore there is no conflict or shame involved.

Respect for hierarchy is a very important value for Thai people. The custom of bun khun, emphasizes the indebtedness towards parents, as well as towards guardians, teachers and caretakers. It describes the feelings and practices involved in certain relationships organized around generalized reciprocity, the slow-acting accounting of an exchange calculated according to locally interpreted scales and measures.[6] It is also considered extremely rude to step on a Thai coin, because the king’s head appears on the coin.

There are a number of Thai customs relating to the special status of monks in Thai society. Due to religious discipline, Thai monks are forbidden physical contact with women. Women are therefore expected to make way for passing monks to ensure that accidental contact does not occur. A variety of methods are employed to ensure that no incidental contact (or the appearance of such contact) between women and monks occurs. Women making offerings to monks place their donation at the feet of the monk, or on a cloth laid on the ground or a table. Powders or unguents intended to carry a blessing are applied to Thai women by monks using the end of a candle or stick. Lay people are expected to sit or stand with their heads at a lower level than that of a monk. Within a temple, monks may sit on a raised platform during ceremonies to make this easier to achieve.

When sitting in a temple, one is expected to point one’s feet away from images of the Buddha. Shrines inside Thai residences are arranged so as to ensure that the feet are not pointed towards the religious icons—such as placing the shrine on the same wall as the head of a bed, if a house is too small to remove the shrine from the bedroom entirely. It is also customary to remove one’s footwear before entering a home or the sacred areas within a temple, and not to step on the threshold.

Traditional clothing

Chut thai

Traditional Thai clothing is called chut thai (Thai: ชุดไทย]) which literally means “Thai outfit”. It can be worn by men, women, and children. Chut thai for women usually consists of a pha nung or a chong kraben, a blouse, and a sabai. Northern and Northeastern women may wear a sinh instead of a pha nung and a chong kraben with either a blouse or a suea pat. Chut thai for men includes a chong kraben or pants, a Raj pattern shirt, with optional knee-length white socks and a sabai. Chut thai for Northern Thai men is composed of a sado, a white Manchu styled jacket, and sometimes a khian hua. In formal occasions, people may choose to wear a chut thai phraratchaniyom.

www.pattaya4leisure.com

New to Pattaya – A simple guide

Below is a list of tips that should make your trip easier and more enjoyable. The list is aimed at Pattaya newbies but is also applicable to those who have been to Pattaya many times. Like anything please treat this for what it is and treat every situation on its own merits. The best attitude to go to Thailand with is to go with the flow, be agreeable and smile a lot.

General Tips

  • Never travel anywhere without travel insurance, insuring this includes full medical cover and repatriation.
  • Thailand is not like your home. You will find some of the ways the Thais do things different, often more practical and better than some western ways.
  • All vehicles on the road have right of way as far as pedestrians go. Do not assume pedestrian crossings across the roads are safe. Motor vehicles here have no obligation to stop for you if you are using these. When crossing the road always look both ways before setting off. This includes one-way streets
  • Never drink the tap water. Bottled water is cheap in Thailand.
  • Be respectful of Thai culture and traditions. Do not insult the king or Buddha. It is considered an insult to go in public without a shirt covering the shoulders.
  • Also stand for the national anthem when its played, this could be in the cinema theatre.
  • For Thais there is a bodily hierarchy. The head is far higher than the feet, with lower body parts being less important. For this reason do not touch a Thais head.
  • It is considered rude to show the bottoms of your feet.
  • If you are eating with Thais don’t blow your nose at the table.
  • When using a toothpick, put one hand in front of your mouth
  • Always smile and don’t act aggressively
  • Don’t talk to anyone with a clipboard in their hands. These people are usually promoting time-shares. They are not good investment opportunities! Likewise avoid shaking the hands of the tailors. They are very reluctant to let go
  • Carry small change for the Baht bus.
  • In bars check your check bin from time to time.
  • You are not obliged to buy lady drinks so be firm but polite.
  • Keep tips to small amounts unless you have received special treatment.
  • Don’t get involved with drugs. If you do the best you can hope for is contributing a very large sum of money to the police fund. If it is serious or you don’t have enough money you may spend some hard time in the ‘monkey house’ (jail).
  • Don’t carry around you foreign ATM card as it will be difficult to replace.
  • Only carry as much money as you need.
  • Don’t flash a lot of cash or wear expensive jewellery. This only attracts the attention of people who you may not want noticing you.
  • Always carry some form of ID. Legally you are required to carry your passport but this is not practical.
  • Thais are fairly conservative for that reason avoid showing affection in public. You will not have any problems in Pattaya but you may elsewhere.
  • Don’t bring too much with you from home. Anything you forget or need can be bought cheaply.
  • Don’t get yourself involved in arguments in Thailand. This includes trying to help in an argument involving a Thai girl. You will only lose
  • Never try to take a photo in a gogo bar. If you need to look at your camera inside a gogo bar make it evident that you are not taking a photo. It is best not to get your camera out at all.

New Year in Pattaya

New Years Eve 2013/14 in Pattaya

2013 is nearly over and there’s still time to start planning your New Years Eve 2013/14 in Pattaya . This year the countdown to 2014 in Pattaya is sure to be even grater than last year. It has become a tradition for Pattaya to go all out to welcome in the New Year in a big way, and this year the activities are sure to fill the city with happy party goers, and one of the most significant firework events in Asia.

Best Parties and Fireworks New Years Eve 2014 in Pattaya

The start of New Years Eve 2014 in Pattaya is usually launched by the Christmas tree lighting the evening before Christmas Day, said to be the most significant in Thailand. The lighting is accompanied by a magnificent fireworks display and the first of several concerts on a big stage. After the opening night festivities there will be a variety of entertainment featured every night, beginning at 8pm and lasting until midnight. The excitement will build over the week to reach a crescendo on New Year’s Eve 2014 in Pattaya with a series of outstanding music performances, ending with the area’s biggest fireworks display of the year.

The focus of Pattaya New Years Eve 2014 will be celebrating at the Bali Hai pier. The stage located at the pier will feature a vast array of both international and Thai music, and the city goes out of its way to cater to all genres of music so everyone can enjoy the entertainment.

New Years Eve 2014 in Pattaya goes into full gear along Pattaya Beach Road, overlooking the beautiful Gulf of Thailand, complete with food and merchandise booths, and entertainment that is sure to suit everyone’s tastes including traditional Thai dancing and songs. The festivities go on all week leading up to New Years Eve and the countdown, following fireworks that light up the entire waterfront area and the city beyond.

Additional New Years Eve celebration in Pattaya activities include checking out nightlife/hotel venues like the Hard Rock Hotel Pattaya. The Sheraton Pattaya Hotel/Resort will more than likely also be hosting its best ever New Years Eve party. Enjoy a magical NYE holiday at the Pattaya Marriott Resort and Spa which usually hosts an exceptional Gala dinner poolside, along with dance performances, live bands, and just about every other experience you would expect from a resort Gala of the Marriott’s calibre. Guests will enjoy a lavish buffet featuring international cuisine, festive holiday delicacies, and even live cooking areas. Everyone also gets the chance to win wonderful prizes throughout the evening. Finally as 2013 winds down, and you toast the New Year as fireworks light up the sky, you’ll be thankful you had the opportunity to enjoy Pattaya’s evening of limitless surprises.

SongKran

Every year people flock to Thailand to experience the traditional Thai New Year which boasts everything from water fights to spectacular religious processions.

Songkran is Thailand’s most famous festival. An important event on the Buddhist calendar, this water festival marks the beginning of the traditional Thai New Year. The name Songkran comes from a Sanskrit word meaning ‘passing’ or ‘approaching’.

In most parts of the country this is a one or two day event, however in Pattaya this stretches from around the 12th April all the way until the 19th April.  Songkran in Pattaya can get a little crazy, if you don’t like getting wet, its best to leave town during this week. If you don’t mind getting wet and enjoy a good party, Pattaya is certainly the place to be.

During the Songkran festival week, wear old clothes or clothes you don’t mind get wet and dirty, place all money, phones, cameras in a plastic waterproof bag.  Certain people will take great pleasure in throwing water over your new camera or phone!

Please see http://www.pattaya4leisure.com/pattayaimages.html for some pictures from Songkran in Soi LK metro Pattaya this year.

Without a doubt, Songkran is a hugely important festival to the Thai people but it’s also very popular with visitors and many tourists specifically arrange their holidays around this unique event. Anyone and everyone can and will get involved in the celebrations. If you’re out and about during Songkran, you’re almost guaranteed to end up soaked but you’ll have lots of fun in the process!

During Songkran many Thai will take holiday. as a result Pattaya 4 Leisure run a skelton serice during the 18th and 19th April, if you need a taxi around these dates book early to avoid disappointment.

http://www.pattaya4leisure.com/taxipattaya.html

 

 

Taxi Koh Chang

Pattaya 4 Leisure have a number of websites all relating to Taxi and Minivan transport in Thailand.  A journey that has become very popular with our customers is to Koh Chang, this is in the province of Trat around 4-5 hours from Bangkok Airport which also includes a 45 minute ferry journey. At around 3.5 hours from Pattaya many take a long weekend on Koh Chang to escape the hustle and bustle of Pattaya.

kohchangferry

There are many beautiful White Sand beaches on Koh Chang, often you can be the only person on the beach, creating your own desert Island.  There are the usual array of Bars, restaurants and hotels, all offering the usual Thai hospitality.

kohchangbeach

kohchange

You can book a taxi online at www.taxikohchang.com

Pattaya Taxi Tips

1. Learn some easy Thai Phrases. Turn left, turn right, and stop are words that will definitely come in useful.

  • leow sai – turn left
  • leow kwaa – turn right
  • jort tee nee – stop here

Drivers will also appreciate your attempt to speak Thai, even if your pronunciation is not correct.  They will also help you to learn a few new phrases.

2. Carry a map or business card from your hotel. Many hotel cards are have both English for you and Thai for the driver. Most cards even have a small map and directions for the drivers. Another way to assure your arrive at the right destination, especially if you don’t speak any Thai, is to ask the one of the hotel staff or your Thai friend to tell your driver where you want to go.

3. Remember your taxi. When you take a taxi, make a mental note or jot down the number of the cab, along with the colour of the taxi.  If you have any issues during or after the taxi journey you can email us.  The taxi driver will always give his or her name, ask them if they haven’t told you, most of our driver speak good English

4. Be aware of scams. All Pattaya 4 Leisure drivers are trained before they are put into service, no driver is permitted to take passengers to anywhere other than there required destination.  At no point will our driver ask you to change vehicles, we have heard many stories of other companies asking passengers to change vehicles just outside the Airport, normally to an inferior vehicle to the one they originally hired.

5. Avoid taxis waiting near tourist areas. It’s always convenient to walk out the door of a local club or the lobby of your hotel and take the first cab you see.  You don’t really know if the driver is reliable, the vehicle is reliable or if the driver will try one of the scams mentioned above.  Book your taxi online, we will come to your hotel and collect you without you having to worry about whether the taxi will be reliable or take you to somewhere you did not request.

You can book here – www.pattaya4leisure.com/taxipattaya.html

Lastly, please treat the drivers with respect. All our drivers are honest and are truly concerned about your comfort and well being. If you do have a conflict with a driver raising your voice or arguing with them goes against Thai ways of communicating and it generally won’t help your cause. It’s much better to be level headed and to talk to the driver calmly or have a Thai person, preferably one with some authority try and solve the situation for you.

Even better – give your cabbie the benefit of the doubt along with a ten or twenty baht tip. They might just be having a bad day and why not cheer them up instead of making their day worse.

Pattaya 4 Leisure Vehicles

Pattaya 4 Leisure has a range of vehicles to suit any need. All fitted with full safety belts, with safety being a highest priority.  We aim to change each vehicle every 5 years, so you should never get a taxi or minivan that is greater than 5 years old. All of our taxi and minivans are serviced regularly and always by a manufacturer authorised  service mechanic.

All vehicles are fully air conditioned. Many include full leather interior to add that extra luxury to your journey.  All include full music centre, please ask our driver for your choice of music.

Our minivans can seat up to 10 people including luggage. We have recently purchased at a new minivan in July 2013.

Pattaya Minivan

Pattaya 4 Leisure - New minivan – Seats up to 10 people.

When purchasing our vehicles we always try and purchase the best model, taking our customers needs  into consideration.  We have recently purchased a new top of the range Honda Accord for our journeys from Bangkok Airport to Pattaya.

Pattaya Taxi

Our new Honda Accord, purchased in June 2013

For further details on all of our vehicles and the services Pattaya 4 Leisure provide, please visit our website http://www.pattaya4leisure.com

 

Hello from Pattaya 4 Leisure

Welcome to the Pattaya 4 Leisure Blog, primarily this blog will be centred around our Pattaya based taxi company, however we have other taxi companies based in Koh Chang, Koh Samet, Hua Hin, Bangkok and Jomtien.  We will aim to update our customers with our latest offers and news while also relaying a few stories from in and around Pattaya.

For further information on our services please visit www.pattaya4leisure.com